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Madagascar, Maroc & Arkansas containers have arrived! Furthermore, a large BACKYARDSALE with 32 tons of rough stones, 173 boxes with rare shells, 117 boxes of Darshan incense and lots of lava images EVERYTHING HAS TO GO! 

 

 

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Goethite from Taouz - Morocco ("the first new find of 2019")

goethite-taouz-filon-12_product

Goethite from Taouz - Morocco ("the first new find of 2019")

Product

Goethite from Taouz - Morocco ("the first new find of 2019")

Description

January 2019 - and our relationship offers us as one of the first Europeans a beautiful crystallized Goethite. Very beautiful but also beautiful "shiny" crystals.

Dimensions

60-90mm

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More information

Goethite (FeO(OH)), (/ˈɡɜːrtaɪt/ GUR-tite) is an iron bearing hydroxide mineral of the diaspore group. It is found in soil and other low-temperature environments. Goethite has been well known since ancient times for its use as a pigment (brown ochre). Evidence has been found of its use in paint pigment samples taken from the caves of Lascaux in France. It was first described in 1806 based on samples found in the Hollertszug Mine in Herdorf, Germany. The mineral was named after the German polymath and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749–1832). In 2003, nanoparticulate authigenic goethite was shown to be the most common diagenetic iron oxyhydroxide in both marine and lake sediments Goethite often forms through the weathering of other iron-rich minerals, and thus is a common component of soils, concentrated in laterite soils. The formation of goethite is marked by the oxidation state change of Fe2+ (ferrous) to Fe3+ (ferric), which allows for goethite to exist at surface conditions. Because of this oxidation state change, goethite is commonly seen as a pseudomorph. As iron-bearing minerals are brought to the zone of oxidation within the soil, the iron turns from iron(II) to iron(III), while the original shape of the parent mineral is retained. Examples of common goethite pseudomorphs are: goethites after pyrite, goethite, siderite, and marcasite, though any iron(II)-bearing mineral could become a goethite pseudomorph if proper conditions are met. It may also be precipitated by groundwater or in other sedimentary conditions, or form as a primary mineral in hydrothermal deposits. Goethite has also been found to be produced by the excretion processes of certain bacteria types.

STRONG TRADEMARKS TIMMERSGEMS GROUP